geo/photo raw materials from a walk around Bristol

I’ve just been for a walk around town, taking a few photos on the way, with the camera’s clock sync’d to that of my new GPS. I’ve not yet figured out the best tool to use (other than write my own) for hooking up the photo and location metadata. It’s easy enough to get the data off of the device using GPSBabel; for now I’ve saved tracks and waypoints in GPX format. GPSBabel offers a wealth of other options, none of which I’ve explored yet.

The first thing I had to hand that consumed GPX was Google Earth on my WinXP laptop; it plotted the tracks happily enough:

2004-07-24 walk around town, plotted via google earth

I’m sure there are other, more open-data and hackable systems out there that I can feed this data to, but for a quick test, Google Earth (formerly ‘Keyhole’) is quite fun.

For Windows users, there are WorldWind scripts that convert GPX into World Wind Layers, available as an online service. I’ve just tried that; it produced me XML document that references a PNG image. I need to read the instructions again a bit more carefully, but nice to see that there’s more to the world than Google. There are also some notes on the OpenStreetMap site on MakingGpxTracks.

The next thing I should try is getting the location and photo metadata integrated, and then I can play around with associating images on maps. There is also a growing geo-tagger community using Flickr (by creating odd ‘tags’ that embed lat/long data). For example see various of jip’s photos, and the geobloggers website (which seems to use HTTP REFERER to plot geotagged flickr images with Google maps).

Update: as I suspected, the Locative guys have already done the work :)

After CPAN-installing the Perl dependencies Image::EXIF and RDF::Simple::Serialiser, Time::Piece, LWP::UserAgent, XML::Simple, Data::Compare and Geo::Track::Log, it looks like geoloc_media.pl is just what I’m after (thanks!).

geoloc_media.pl 0 http://rdfweb.org/people/danbri/media/2005/07/ ../../mydata/2005-07-24-Tracks.gpx    danbri@foaf-project.org 2004-07-24-BristolWalk/*jpg

The resulting RDF looks about right, from a quick look.

Here’s a quick query of the data using the online Redland SPARQL service. The query I ran was as follows (basically echoing back the core data structure emitted by the perl script above):

PREFIX foaf: <http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/>
PREFIX geo: <http://www.w3.org/2003/01/geo/wgs84_pos#>
PREFIX locative: <http://locative.net/2004/packet#>

SELECT DISTINCT ?image, ?lat, ?long, ?email 
WHERE {
  ?x rdf:type locative:Packet .
  ?x locative:media ?image .
  ?x geo:lat ?lat .
  ?x geo:long ?long .
  ?image foaf:maker ?who .
  ?who foaf:mbox ?email . 
}
ORDER BY ?lat

See the Locative wiki for more uses of the data, including some nice SVG hacks. Or the OpenStreetMap view of the area (seems to be bitmap imagery there but no streets etc yet).

Conspiracy Theory?

There are two kinds of people in the world, those who believe there are two kinds of people in the world and those who don’t.

–Robert Benchley, Benchley’s Law of Distinction

From a recent Guardian article, “Police scrutinise extremist Islamist websites“:

Among the sites causing concern is Jihadunspun (JUS), a highly professional website which claims to present “a clear view of war on terror”. It has been widely criticised in the US by agencies including the state department.

Nearby in the Web, Google News carry the site, causing much grumbling amongst those who’ve noticed its iffy content.

Digging around a bit more unearthed a bit of controversy around the site, specifically, claims that it is a CIA front. For example, see commentary on the Wisdom Fund site, or Information Clearing House. Both of which draw attention to the Canadian hosting of the site, its use of PayPal to sell video content, etc.

Who to believe? :)

Rummaging on the JUS site itself, there’s a lengthy and peculiar story from its “owner and publisher”:

My name is Khadija Abdul Qahaar and I am the owner and publisher of Jihad Unspun. I am Muslim, who like many others, embraced Islam as the result of 911. Many of our viewers will know me as Bev Kennedy and Paul Morris-Read, the pen names I have used on this portal, a necessary precaution particularly in the early days of publishing this portal, due to the nature of our work. [...]

Most intriguingly…

For the curious, a copy of my CV is located here.

That article mentions “Bev’s” prior work in the Web industry, and her work for the “aerospace market”. The CV includes 1999-2003 as president/director/shareholder of DataCrafters Inc. Their website is now blank, but much of it is available through the Internet Archive. The Client Kudos section is interesting, as is the Before and after page, which features happy customer Royell Manufacturing, makers of aerospace parts. Back in the pre-9/11 copy of the site, the “spinbin” section had a press release announcing the release of the “eSYS Online Estimating System”, including a glowing quote from a Robin Crabb of Aeroalliance, (whose website is full of pictures of scary military jets):

“We are delighted that eSYS is now in beta testing. With feedback from high caliber Aeroalliance members like Royell, we are confident that we will have captured the ease of use and familiarity of process that aerospace manufacturers find appealing.”

The company seems to have had a lot of dealings with the military-tinged aerospace industry, before Bev switched to working on JUS. Bev’s autobiographical note on the JUS goes into some detail describing her change of heart, as – if you believe twf.org – does this lengthy letter, which also discusses the “CIA front” accusation. Whatever the truth, it’d make for a good movie.

I could go on, there’s plenty more out there on the site. It’s hard to know really what the Guardian guys should’ve done. Ten minutes of digging around the background to DataCrafters does suggest a remarkable change of heart, and one that’s not documented heavily on the JUS site.

Is the “this is a CIA front” accusation purely an exercise in tin-foil hattery? Who knows!

Another quote from the JUS site, puffing up the warmongering ‘clash of civilizations’ agenda…

I named the portal as a reference to Benjamin Barber’s best seller, Jihad vs. McWorld, an excellent work that explains the clash of two civilizations, but that entirely omits the reason why. The result was Jihad Unspun.

Update: there’s a huge and often silly, offensive etc thread on the libertyforum.org site. See also jihadunspun unhinged on the Internet Haganah site; they seems to take JUS seriously and quote from Bev’s JUS-hosted story:

Late in 2002, the Jewish vigilante groups struck with a vengeance. Through a stupid error on our part, we had a portfolio gallery showing off some of our client work on our web company’s website and after putting two and two together, they managed to access some of our client list. They of course went after the aerospace companies and I was forced to sell of my aerospace application at a significant loss and eventually I had shut down the company entirely in order to protect my clients.

I wonder what happens next…

Sample SPARQL query

PREFIX dc: <http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/>
SELECT ?book ?title ?authorname
WHERE { 
?book dc:creator ?author .
?author dc:type <http ://hoppa.com/Painters/> .
      ?author dc:title ?authorname .
      ?book dc:title ?title .
}

…works with rdf data describing some books by painters. I tested in Dave Beckett’s Redland-based online SPARQL demo. The query finds 5 results. Seems to have some encoding errors, but apart from that, is fine. There are more DawgShows in the ESW wiki. The sparql.org demo (using Jena) also works.

Data syndication

There have been various developments in the last week, via Planet RDF, on the topic of data syndication using RSS/Atom.

Edd Dumbill on iTunes RSS extensions; a handy review of the extensions they’ve added to support a “podcasting” directory. See also comments from Danny.

Nearby in the Web, Yahoo! and friends are still busy with their their media RSS spec, which lives on the rss-media yahoogroups list. Yahoo are also looking creative on other fronts. Today’s Yahoo! Search blog has an entry on Yahoo! Maps, which again uses RSS extensions to syndicate map-related data:

The Yahoo! Maps open API is based on geoRSS, a RSS 2.0 with w3c geo extension. For more information check out developer.yahoo.net/maps. We also offer API support via a group forum at yws-maps.

This is particularly interesting to me, as they’re picking up the little geo: namespace I made with collaborators from the W3C Semantic Web (formerly RDF) Interest Group.

Although the namespace was designed to be used in RDF, they’re using it in non-RDF RSS2 documents. This is a little dissapointing, since it makes the data less available to RDF processors. RSS1, of course, was designed as an RDF application specifically to support such data-centric extensions. Yahoo! have some developer pages with more detail, but they seem to have picked up where the Worldkit Flash RSS geocoding project left off. Worldkit attaches geo:lat and geo:long information to RSS2 items, and can display these in a Flash-based UI.

The WGS 84 geo vocabulary used here by Worldkit and Yahoo! was a collaborative experiment in minimalism. The GIS world has some very rich, sophisticated standards. The idea with the geo: namespace was to take the tiniest step towards reflecting that world into the RDF data-merging environment. RDF is interesting precisely because it allows for highly mixed, yet predictably structured, data mixing.

So that little geo namespace experiment (thanks to the efforts of various geo/mapping hackers, most of whom aren’t very far in FOAF space from Jo Walsh) seems to be proving its worth. A little bit of GIS can go a very long way.

I should at this point stress that the “w3c geo extension” (as Yahoo!’s search blog calls it” is an informal, pre-standardisation piece of work. This is important to stress, particularly given that the work is associated with W3C, both through hosting of the namespace document and because it came about as a collaboration of theW3C RDF/SW Interest Group. If it were the product of a real W3C Working Group, it would have received much more careful review. Someone might have noticed the inadquate (or non-) definition of geo:alt, for example!

I’m beginning to think that a small but more disciplined effort at W3C around RDF vocabulary for geo/mapping (with appropriate liasion to GIS standards) would be timely. But I digress. I was talking about data syndication. Going back to the Yahoo! maps example… they have taken RSS2, and the SWIG Geo vocab, and added a number of extensions that relate to their mapping interface (image, zoom etc), as well as Address, CityState, Zip, Country code, etc. Useful entities to have
markup for. In an RDF environment I’d probably have used vCard for those.

Yahoo aren’t the only folk getting creative with RSS this week. Microsoft have published some information on their work, including some draft proposals for extending RSS with “lists”. This, again, brings an emphasis back to RSS for data syndication. In other words, RSS documents as a carrier for arbitrary other information whose dissemination fits the syndication/publication model of RSS. Some links on the Microsoft proposal are on scoble’s blog. See Microsoft’s RSS in Longhorn page for details and a link to their
Simple List Extensions specification, which seems to focus on allowing RSS feeds to be presented as lists of items, including use of datatyped (and hence sortable) extensions.