in FOAF

Begin again

facebook grabThere was an old man named Michael Finnegan
He went fishing with a pinnegan
Caught a fish and dropped it in again
Poor old Michael Finnegan
Begin again.

Let me clear something up. Danny mentions a discussion with Tim O’Reilly about SemWeb themes.

Much as I generally agree with Danny, I’m reaching for a ten-foot bargepole on this one point:

While Facebook may have achieved pretty major adoption for their approach, it’s only very marginally useful because of their overly simplistic treatment of relationships.

Facebook, despite the trivia, the endless wars between the ninja zombies and the pirate vampires; despite being centralised, despite [insert grumble] is massively useful. Proof of that pudding: it is massively used. “Marginal” doesn’t come into it. The real question is: what happens next?

Imagine 35 million people. Imagine them marching thru your front room. Jumping off a table at the same time. Sending you an email. Or turning the tap off when they brush their teeth. 35 million is a fair-sized nation. Taking that 35 million figure I’ve heard waved around, and placing it in the ever scientific Wikipedia listing … that puts the land of Facebook somewhere between Kenya and Algeria in the population charts. Perhaps the figures are exagerrated. Perhaps a few million have wandered off, or forgotten their passwords. Doubtless some only use it every month or few.

Even a million is a lot of use; and a lot of usefulness.

Don’t let anything I ever say here in this blog be taken as claiming such sites and services are only marginally useful. To be used is to be useful; and that’s something SemWeb people should keep in the forefront of their minds. And usually they do, I think, although the community tends towards the forward-looking.

But let’s be backwards-looking for a minute. My concern with these sites is not that they’re marginally useful, but that they could be even more useful. Slight difference of emphasis. SixDegrees.com was great, back in 2000 when we started FOAF. But it was a walled garden. It had cool graph traversal stuff that evocatively showed your connection path to anyone else in the network. Their network. Then followed Friendster, which got slow as it proved useful to too many people. Ditto Orkut, which everyone signed up to, then wandered off from when it proved there was rather little to do there except add people. MySpace and Facebook cracked that one, … but guess what, there’ll be more.

I got a signup to Yahoo’s Mash yesterday. Anyone wanna be my friend? It has fun stuff (“Mecca Ibrahim smacked The Mash Pet (your Mash pet)!”), … wiki-like profile editing, extension modules … and I’d hope given that this is 2007, eventually some form of API. People won’t live in Facebook-land forever. Nor in Mash, however fun it is. I still lean towards Jabber/XMPP as the long-term infrastructure for this sort of system, but that’s for another time. The appeal of SixDegrees, of Friendster, of Orkut … wasn’t ever the technology. It was the people. I was there ‘cos others were there. Nothing more. And I don’t see this changing, no matter how much the underlying technology evolves. And people move around, drift along to the next shiny thing, … go wherever their friends are. Which is our only real problem here.

Begin again.

I’ve been messing with RDF a bit. I made a sample SPARQL query that asks (exported RDF from) a few networks about my IM addresses; here are the results from Redland/Rasqal JSON.

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