in openid

A tale of two business models

Glancing back at 1998, thanks to the Wayback Machine.

W3C has Royalty Free licensing requirements and a public Process Document for good reason. I’ve been clicking back through the papertrails around the W3C P3P vs InterMind patent issue as a reminder. Here is the “Appendix C: W3C Licensing Plan Summary” from the old Intermind site:

We expect to license the patents to practice the P3P standard as it evolves over time as follows:

User Agents: For User Agent functionality, all commercial licensees will pay a royalty of 1% of revenues directly associated with the use of P3P or 0.1% of all revenues directly associated with the product employing the User Agent at the licensee’s option. We expect to measure revenues in a confidential and mutually acceptable manner with the licensee.

Service Providers: For Service Provider functionality, all commercial licensees will pay a royalty of 1% of revenues directly associated with the use of P3P. We expect to measure these revenues through the use of Web site logs, which will determine the percentage of P3P-related traffic and apply that percentage to the relevant Web site revenues (i.e., advertising-based revenues or transaction-based revenues). We expect to determine a method for monitoring or auditing such logs in a confidential and mutually acceptable manner with the licensee.

[...]

Intermind Corporation also expects to license the patents for CDF, ICE, and other XML-based agent technology on non-discriminatory terms. Members interested in further information on the relationship of Intermind’s patents to these technologies can contact Drummond Reed at drummond@intermind.com or 206-812-6000.

Nearby in the Web:

Cover Pages on Extensible Name Service (XNS):

Background: “In January 1999, the first of Intermind’s web agent patents began being issued (starting with U.S. patent No. 5,862,325). At the heart of this patent was a new naming and addressing service based on web agent technology. With the emergence of XML as a new global data interchange language — one perfectly suited to the requirements of a global ‘language’ for web agents — Intermind changed its name to OneName Corporation, built a new board and management team, and embarked on the development of this new global naming and addressing service. Because its use of XML as the foundation for all object representation and interchange led to the platform, yet had the same distributed architecture as DNS, it was christened eXtensible Name Service, or XNS. Recognizing the ultimate impact such a system may have on Internet infrastructure, and the crucial role that privacy, security, and trust must play, OneName also made the commitment to building it with open standards, open source software, and an open independent governance organization. Thus was born the XNS Public Trust Organization (XNSORG), the entity charged with setting the technical, operational, and legal standards for XNS.”

Over on XDIORG – Licenses and Agreements:

Summary of the XDI.ORG Intellectual Property Rights Agreement

NOTE: This summary is provided as a convenience to readers and is not intended in any way to modify or substitute for the full text of the agreement.

The purpose of the XDI.ORG IPR Agreement between XDI.ORG and OneName Corporation (dba Cordance) is to facilitate and promote the widespread adoption of XDI infrastructure by transfering the intellectual property rights underlying the XDI technology to a community-governed public trust organization.

The agreement grants XDI.ORG exclusive, worldwide, royalty-free license to a body of patents, trademarks, copyrights, and specifications developed by Cordance on the database linking technology underlying XDI. In turn, it requires that XDI.ORG manage these intellectual property rights in the public interest and make them freely available to the Internet community as royalty-free open standards. (It specifically adopts the definition provided by Bruce Perens which includes the ability for XDI.ORG to protect against “embrace and enhance” strategies.)

There is also a Global Service Provider aspect to this neutral, royalty-free standard. Another excerpt:

Summary of the XDI.ORG Global Service Provider Agreement

NOTE: This summary is provided as a convenience to readers and is not intended in any way to modify or substitute for the full text of the agreement.

Global Services are those XDI services offered by Global Service Providers (GSPs) based on the XRI Global Context Symbols (=, @, +, !) to facilitate interoperability of XDI data interchange among all users/members of the XDI community. XDI.ORG governs the provision of Global Services and has the authority to contract with GSPs to provide them to the XDI community.

For each Global Service, XDI.ORG may contract with a Primary GSP (similar to the operator of a primary nameserver in DNS) and any number of Secondary GSPs (similar to the operator of a secondary DNS nameserver). The Secondary GSPs mirror the Primary for loadbalancing and failover. Together, the Primary and Secondary GSPs operate the infrastructure for each Global Service according to the Global Services Specifications published and maintained by XDI.ORG.

The initial XDI.ORG GSP Agreement is between XDI.ORG and OneName Corporation (dba Cordance). The agreement specifies the rights and obligations of both XDI.ORG and Cordance with regard to developing and operating the first set of Global Services. For each of these services, the overall process is as follows:

  • If Cordance wishes to serve as the Primary GSP for a service, it must develop and contribute an initial Global Service Specification to XDI.ORG.
  • XDI.ORG will then hold a public review of the Global Service Specification and amend it as necessary.
  • Once XDI.ORG approves the Global Service Specification, Cordance must implement it in a commercially reasonable period. If Cordance is not able to implement or operate the service as required by the Global Service Specification, XDI.ORG may contract with another party to be the primary GSP.
  • XDI.ORG may contract with any number of Secondary GSPs.
  • If XDI.ORG desires to commence a new Global Service and Cordance does not elect to develop the Global Service Specification or provide the service, XDI.ORG is free to contract with another party.

The contract has a fifteen year term and covers a specified set of Global Services. Those services are divided into two classes: cost-based and fee-based. Cost-based services will be supplied by Cordance at cost plus 10%. Fee-based services will be supplied by Cordance at annual fees not to exceed maximums specified in the agreement. These fees are the wholesale cost to XDI.ORG; XDI.ORG will then add fees from any other GSPs supplying the service plus its own overhead fee to determine the wholesale price to registrars (registrars then set their own retail prices just as with DNS). Cordance’s wholesale fees are based on a sliding scale by volume and range from U.S. $5.40 down to $3.40 per year for global personal i-names and from U.S. $22.00 down to $13.50 per year for global organizational i-names.

The agreement also ensures all registrants of the original XNS Personal Name Service and Organizational Name Service have the right to convert their original XNS registration into a new XDI.ORG global i-name registration at no charge. This conversion period must last for at least 90 days after the commencement of the new global i-name service.

Over on inames.net, Become an i-broker:

What Is an I-Broker?

From Wikipedia:

“I-brokers are ‘bankers for data’ or ‘ISPs for identity services’–trusted third parties that help people and organizations share private data the same way banks help us exchange funds and ISPs help us exchange email and files.”

I-brokers are the core providers of XRI digital identity infrastructure. They not only provide i-name and i-number registration services, but also they provide i-services: a new layer of digital identity services that help people and business safely interact on the Internet. See the I-Service Directory for the first open-standard i-services that can be offered by any XDI.org-accredited i-broker.

How Does an I-Broker Become XDI.org-Accredited?

Cordance and NeuStar, together with XDI.org, have published a short guide to the process, “Becoming an I-Broker,” which includes all the information necessary to get started. It also includes contact information for the i-broker support teams at both companies.

Download Becoming an I-Broker

In addition the following two zip files contain all the documents needed by an i-broker. The first one contains the i-broker application and agreements, which are appendicies F and I of the XDI.org Global Services Specifications (GSS), located in their complete form at http://gss.xdi.org. The second one contains all the rest of the GSS documents referenced by the application and agreement.

From that downloadable PDF,

What is the application fee?
The standard application fee is USD $2500. However between the GRS opening on June 20th and the
start of Digital ID World 2006 on September 11, 2006, you may apply to Cordance to have the fee offset
by development and marketing commitments. For more information, contact Cordance or NeuStar at the
addresses below.

In the XDI.org GSS wiki,

6.1. Appendix B: Fee Schedules

Taking a look at that, we see:

Global Services Specification V1.0
Appendix B: Fee Schedule
Revised Version: 1 September, 2007

[...]

This and all contributions to XDI.org are open, public, royalty-free specifications licensed
under the XDI.org license available at http://www.xdi.org/docref/legal/xdi-org-license.html.

…where I find I can buy a personal i-name for $5/year, or a business i-name for 29.44, as in individual. Or as “become an i-broker” points out,

For volume pricing, contact Cordance or NeuStar at the addresses below.

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