Small databases, loosly joined

Over the last month or so, I’ve had a SPARQL store (just an ARC instance plus a loader script) running on the Amazon EC2 sandbox I set up for FOAF experiments. Yesterday I installed a fresh SparqlPress bundle into my own blog, which runs on another server. So how to get the data across? Since SparqlPress includes a scutter, which despite Urban Dictionary is just the FOAF term for RDF crawler, we can set it to crawl a Web of linked RDF. Here’s a SPARQL query on the former installation which sets up some pointers to each graph (scutters often follow rdfs:seeAlso, amongst other techniques). It’s interesting too because it summarises the data found in each graph, simply by listing properties.

CONSTRUCT {
<http://danbri.org/foaf.rdf#danbri> <http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#seeAlso> ?g .
?g <http://purl.org/net/scutter/vocabItem> ?p .
}
WHERE {
GRAPH ?g { ?s ?p ?o }
}

The sc:vocabItem property is a work of fiction; I’ve not searched around to see if similar things already exist. The idea of linking together medium-sized repositories of metadata is an old one. The Harvest crawling/indexing system did this with RDM/SOIF. In a similar vein was WHOIS++, a now-obsolete directory system that some of us tried using for resource discovery in the late 90s – collections of Web site descriptions federated through having each server syndicate a summary of its content (record types, field names, and tokenized field values). I hadn’t really thought of it this way until I wrote this query, but SparqlPress could in some ways support a reimplementation of the Harvest and WHOIS++ design, if we have gatherer and broker roles attached to a network of blogs. All these ideas are of course close to the P2P scene too: little datasets exchanging summaries of their content to aid query routing. The main point here is that we can run a pretty simple SPARQL query, and get a summary of the contents of various named data graphs; the results of the query in turn give a summary of a database that has copies of these graphs.

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