Monthly Archives: November 2010

How to tell you’re living in the future: bacterial computers, HTML and RDF

Clue no.1. Papers like “Solving a Hamiltonian Path Problem with a bacterial computer” barely raise an eyebrow. Clue no.2. Undergraduates did most of the work. And the clincher, … Clue no.3. The paper is shared nicely in the Web, using HTML, Creative Commons document license, and useful RDF can be found nearby. From those-crazy-eggheads dept, [...]

Lonclass and RDF

Lonclass is one of the BBC’s in-house classification systems – the “London classification”. I’ve had the privilege of investigating lonclass within the NoTube project. It’s not currently public, but much of what I say here is also applicable to the Universal Decimal Classification (UDC) system upon which it was based. UDC is also not fully [...]

Disambiguating with DBpedia

Sketchy notes. Say you’re looking for an identifier for something, and you know it’s a company/organization, and you have a label “Woolworths”. What can be done to choose amongst the results we find in DBpedia for this crude query? PREFIX rdfs: <http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#> select distinct ?x where { ?x a <http://dbpedia.org/ontology/Organisation>; ¬†rdfs:label ?l . FILTER(REGEX(?l, “Woolworths*”)). [...]

Sagan on libraries

“Books permit us to voyage through time, to tap the wisdom of our ancestors. The library connects us with the insights and knowledge, painfully extracted from Nature, of the greatest minds that ever were, with the best teachers, drawn from the entire planet and from all of our history, to instruct us without tiring, and [...]

Easier in RDFa: multiple types and the influence of syntax on semantics

RDF is defined as an abstract data model, plus a collection of practical notations for exchanging RDF descriptions (eg. RDF/XML, RDFa, Turtle/N3). In theory, your data modelling activities are conducted in splendid isolation from the sleazy details of each syntax. RDF vocabularies define classes of thing, and various types of property/relationship that link those things. [...]