Inmaps

From LinkedIn’s networking graphing service; see also my map

I’ve been digging around in graph-mining and visualization tools lately, and this use at LinkedIn is one of the few cases where such things actually break through into mainstream usefulness. Well, perhaps not useful, but it’s nice to see how groups overlap.

In my chart here, the big tight-knit, self-referential cluster on the left is Joost, the TV startup I joined in 2006/7. At the top there is another tightly-linked community: the W3C team, where I worked 1999-2005. In between is a fuzzier cluster that I can only label ‘Web 2′, ‘Social Web’, … lots of Web technology standards sort of people. Then there are the linkers, like Max Froumentin and Robin Berjon between the W3C and Joost worlds, or Libby Miller and folk from the Asemantics and Apache scene (Alberto Reggiori, Stefano Mazzocchi) who link Joost through to the Semantic Web scene in the lower right.

The LinkedIn analysis finds distinct clusters that are fairly easy to identify as “Digital Libraries (Museums, Archives…)” and “Linked Data / RDF / Semantic Web”, even while being richly interconnected. I’m not suprised there’s a cluster for the VU University Amsterdam (even though well-linked to SW and digital libraries). However the presence of a BBC cluster was a surprise; either it shows how closely-knit the BBC community is, or just how much I’ve been hanging around with them. And that’s the intriguing thing; each individual map is just a per-person view, a thin slice through the bigger picture. It must be fun to see the whole dataset…

For more on all this, see LinkedIn or the inmaps site.

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