Return to LambdaMOO

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                          *  Welcome to LambdaMOO!  *
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PLEASE NOTE:
LambdaMOO is a new kind of society, where thousands of people 
voluntarily come together from all over the world.  What these 
people say or do may not always be to your liking; as when visiting
any international city, it is wise to be careful who you associate 
with and what you say. 

The operators of LambdaMOO have provided the materials for 
the buildings of this community, but are not responsible for 
what is said or done in them. 

It’s a long time since I went back to LambdaMOO. Experimenting with the visually lush Google Earth application this week reminded me of nothing more than my first explorations of LambdaMOO. Despite the visual differences and the passing years, both applications offer a virtual globe that can be collaboratively annotated and extended by users, both are a taste of things to come, and both leave a lot unsaid on the topic of Bristol. When Google engineers ponder where to go with KML (mappings to GML, inclusion of style and UI-related markup, etc), I’m sure they’ll be giving some thought to non-graphical interfaces to such data. LambdaMOO, to me, suggests that non-visual (including voice) interfaces could be every bit as compelling as a 3D flyover.

*** Connected ***

The Coat Closet
The closet is a dark, cramped space.  It appears  to be very crowded in here;
 you keep bumping into what feels like coats,  boots, and other people
 (apparently sleeping).  One useful thing that you've  discovered in your
 bumbling about is a metal doorknob set at waist level into  what might be a
 door.  Next to it is a spring lever labeled 'QUIET!'.
There is new news.  Type `news' to read all news or `news new' to read just
 new news.
Type `@tutorial' for an introduction to basic MOOing.  If you have not already
 done so, please type `help manners' and read the text carefully.  It outlines
 the community standard of conduct, which each player is expected to follow
 while in LambdaMOO.

open door

You open the closet door and leave the darkness for the living room, closing
 the door behind you so as not to wake the sleeping people inside.
The Living Room
It is very bright, open, and airy here, with large plate-glass windows looking
 southward over the pool to the gardens beyond.  On the north wall, there is a
 rough stonework fireplace.  The east and west walls are almost completely
 covered with large, well-stocked bookcases.  An exit in the northwest corner
 leads to the kitchen and, in a more northerly direction, to the entrance
 hall.  The door into the coat closet is at the north end of the east wall,
 and at the south end is a sliding glass door leading out onto a wooden deck.
 There are two sets of couches, one clustered around the fireplace and one
 with a view out the windows.
You see Welcome Poster, a fireplace, the living room couch, Helpful Person
 Finder, Cockatoo, The Birthday Machine, and lag meter here.
neural (dozing), lilakay (dozing), Evil (out on his feet), Fred_Smythe
 (dozing), and Ultraviolet_Guest are here.

north

The Entrance Hall
This small foyer is the hub of the currently-occupied portion of the house.
 To the north are the double doors forming the main entrance to the house.
 There is a mirror at about head height on the east wall, just to the right of
 a corridor leading off into the bedroom area.  The south wall is all rough
 stonework, the back of the living room fireplace; at the west end of the wall
 is the opening leading south into the living room and southwest into the
 kitchen.  Finally, to the west is an open archway leading into the dining
 room.
You see mirror at about head height, MOO population meter, Edgar the Footman,
 an antique suit of armour, and a globe here.

enter globe

You step into the globe...
Earth
A big blue-green planet.
This is Mapgrrl, Sparklebunny, Audrey, Boreal, Alista, tiny_ant, Zeddie,
 Pandemonium, mscope, Pasha, and entropygatherer's hometown.
Within Earth you see: Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, South
 America, and Antarctica.

enter europe

Europe, Earth
Small continent, many countries.
Within Europe you see: England, Italy, Scotland, France, Germany, Russia,
 belgium, Netherlands, Ireland, Norway, wales , Gibraltar, Sweden, Austria,
 Spain, Bulgaria, and Praha.

enter england

England, Europe
Heritage UK plc--purveyors of fine shortbread and Princess Di Memorial Plates
 to the rest of the Globe.
Within England you see: London, Kingston, Rainhill, bradford, Winchester,
 Derby, Knebworth, Stratford-upon-Avon, Oxford, Hereford, Newcastle,
 Southampton, Birmingham, Southend-on-Sea, Reading, Devon, Bristol, Watford,
 Rickmansworth, Croxley, and Warwickshire.

enter bristol

Bristol, England
This place isn't very interesting. Perhaps you should describe it, or go
 someplace more interesting.

leave

England, Europe
Heritage UK plc--purveyors of fine shortbread and Princess Di Memorial Plates
 to the rest of the Globe.
Within England you see: London, Kingston, Rainhill, bradford, Winchester,
 Derby, Knebworth, Stratford-upon-Avon, Oxford, Hereford, Newcastle,
 Southampton, Birmingham, Southend-on-Sea, Reading, Devon, Bristol, Watford,
 Rickmansworth, Croxley, and Warwickshire.

enter london

London, England
Earth has not anything to show more fair: dull would he be of soul who could
 pass by a sight so touching in its majesty...
Within London you see: Soho, Westminster Bridge, Camden, West Kensington,
 somerset house, Leytonstone, and Brixton.

enter Brixton

Brixton, London
Whatever you want, you find it here, mate...

Punched up colour

An old debate – how much is it acceptable to “tweak” an image’s colour – resurfaced on BAGnewsNotes. The article drew attention (amongst other things) to the colouring of an image from Iraq:

When I mention this following point, some people take me to task for calling out a standard — if fairly recent — convention used frequently by the NYT. If you’ll notice, this image is super color-saturated. (Just look at how punched up the orange is, or the baby’s clothes.) The effect is to make the image more lush and visually seductive. The net effect is a troubling contradiction between the content and its sensory impact.

What I found interesting was that the original photojournalist Alan Chin showed up in the blog comments, and provided his perspective, as well as a copy of his original photograph and the version that he submitted to the NYTimes (details). The resulting interactions were intelligent and largely non-adversarial, despite the different views of the various posters. Not something you see everyday in such discussions…

An entirely non-photorealistic derrivative of the original image (which I'll take down if asked...

Profiling GML for RSS/Atom, RDF and Web developers

I spent some time yesterday talking with Ron Lake about GML, RDF, RSS and other acronyms. GML was originally an RDF application, and various RDFisms can still be seen in the design. I learned a fair bit about GML, and about its extensibility and profiling mechanisms.

We discussed some possibilities for sharing data between GML, RSS/Atom and RDF environments. In particular, two options: RDF inside GML; and RDFized GML.

The possibility of embedding islands of RDF inside GML (eg. the GML for a restaurant might use RDF for restaurant-review or menu markup) is interesting, as would allow GML documents to use any RDF vocabulary to describe the features on a map. Currently, such extension data typically requires the creation of a custom XML Schema. The other option, “RDFized GML”, is to explore the creation of an RDF vocabulary that allows some useful subset of GML data to be used in RDF. I’ll come back to this in a minute.

While GML comes from the world of professional GIS, its influence is being felt more widely: Google Earth (formerly Keyhole) uses something called KML, which bears a great many similarities with GML. Meanwhile in the RDF and RSS/Atom world, the very basic addition of “geo:lat” and “geo:long” tagging (sometimes using the W3C SemWeb IG WGS_84 namespace) has got a number of toolmakers interested. This year has seen the release of Yahoo! Maps, Google Maps, Google Earth and most recently Microsoft Virtual Earth. We’ve also seen the release of the excellent Mapping Hacks book, and increasing interest in this area from Web developers.

Although the experimental SWIG RDF vocabulary only deals with points described in WGS_84, there have been various discussions on possible extensions (eg. RDFGeom-2d from Chris Goad). These are intriguing, but we should be careful to avoid re-inventing wheels. Basically, I think we have all the ingredients for a hybrid approach: an RDFized GML subset designed for use by Web developers alongside RSS/Atom, FOAF and other public-facing XML formats. GML serves well as a data format in the GIS community, but some work is needed to find a subset that will find adoption in the wider Web.

The tiny W3C SWIG vocab, and related geo:lat/long tagging of “geo”-RSS feeds has shown that there is real interest in a lightweight XML-based mechanism for sharing map-related markup. GML shows us (via a 600 page specification, for GML 3.1) quite how rich and complex a problem space we’re facing, and KML demonstrates that a medium-sized “GML lite” subset can get traction with webmasters and developers, when backed by useful tools and services.

There are two pieces of work to do here (setting aside for now the topic of RDF islands within GML documents). Let’s first find a strawman profile of GML. From my limited knowledge and discussion with others, something “GML 2-ish” but profiled against GML 3.1, is the area to explore. Then we try getting those data structures into RDF, so it can mix freely with other information.

I understand from Ron Lake that profiling is something that is actively encouraged for GML, and there are even tools to support it that come with the spec: have a look at subsetutility.zip. These files (thanks Ron!) show a pretty easy path for experimentation with profiles. In addition to the schema subsetting utilities, the .zip also includes (just as an example to help me understand GML) an example application schema CommonObjects.xsd, showing how to define things like ‘Building’, ‘River’, and a sample instance .xml file that uses it.

To use the profiling tool, just put the unzipped files directly in the base/ directory of .xsd files that ships with GML 3.1, then run an XSLT processor to generate a GML subset.

xsltproc depends.xsl gml.xsd > _gml.dep

xsltproc GML3.1.1Subset.xsl _gml.dep > _gmlSubset.xsd

…and that’s your profile. The scripts take care of all the dependencies (ie. they’ll read the 29 XML Schemas, so you don’t have to :)

The bits of GML you want are specified as parameters in GML3.1.1Subset.xsl. The default in this .zip is: gml:Point, gml:LineString, gml:Polygon, gml:LinearRing, gml:Observation, gml:TimeInstant, gml:TimePeriod

I’m no GML expert, but if someone can help get some instance data matching such a profile, I’ll have a go at RDFizing it. Also, of course, it will be useful to debate how many facilities from full GML would find use in the Webmaster (RSS, KML etc) scene.

Disclaimer: for now this is purely an informal collaboration. If we make something interesting, it might be worth investigation of something more formal between W3C (home of RDF, and where I work) and OGC (home of GML). For now, let’s just try out some ideas…

Sample SPARQL query

PREFIX dc: <http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/>
SELECT ?book ?title ?authorname
WHERE { 
?book dc:creator ?author .
?author dc:type <http ://hoppa.com/Painters/> .
      ?author dc:title ?authorname .
      ?book dc:title ?title .
}

…works with rdf data describing some books by painters. I tested in Dave Beckett’s Redland-based online SPARQL demo. The query finds 5 results. Seems to have some encoding errors, but apart from that, is fine. There are more DawgShows in the ESW wiki. The sparql.org demo (using Jena) also works.