Inmaps

From LinkedIn’s networking graphing service; see also my map

I’ve been digging around in graph-mining and visualization tools lately, and this use at LinkedIn is one of the few cases where such things actually break through into mainstream usefulness. Well, perhaps not useful, but it’s nice to see how groups overlap.

In my chart here, the big tight-knit, self-referential cluster on the left is Joost, the TV startup I joined in 2006/7. At the top there is another tightly-linked community: the W3C team, where I worked 1999-2005. In between is a fuzzier cluster that I can only label ‘Web 2′, ‘Social Web’, … lots of Web technology standards sort of people. Then there are the linkers, like Max Froumentin and Robin Berjon between the W3C and Joost worlds, or Libby Miller and folk from the Asemantics and Apache scene (Alberto Reggiori, Stefano Mazzocchi) who link Joost through to the Semantic Web scene in the lower right.

The LinkedIn analysis finds distinct clusters that are fairly easy to identify as “Digital Libraries (Museums, Archives…)” and “Linked Data / RDF / Semantic Web”, even while being richly interconnected. I’m not suprised there’s a cluster for the VU University Amsterdam (even though well-linked to SW and digital libraries). However the presence of a BBC cluster was a surprise; either it shows how closely-knit the BBC community is, or just how much I’ve been hanging around with them. And that’s the intriguing thing; each individual map is just a per-person view, a thin slice through the bigger picture. It must be fun to see the whole dataset…

For more on all this, see LinkedIn or the inmaps site.

Chocolate Teapot

chocolate teapot

Michael Sparks in the BBC Backstage permathread on DRM:

However any arguments based on open standards do need to take facts into account though. Such as this one: The BBC is currently required by the rights holders to use DRM.

Tell me how you can have a DRM system that’s completely free software, and I’ll readily listen and push for such an approach. (I doubt I’ll get anywhere, but I’ll try)

The two ideas strike me as fundamentally opposed concepts. After all one tries to protect your right to use your system in any way you like (for me modifying it the system is a use), whereas the other tries to prevent you using your computer to do something. I’ve said this before of course. No-one has yet said how they’d securely prevent trivial access to the keys and trivially prevent data dumping (ala vlc’s dump to disk option).

So personally I can’t actually see how you can have a completely free software DRM system and have that system viewed as _sufficiently secure_ from the DRM proponents side of things. Kinda like a chocolate tea pot. I like to be proved wrong about things things. (chocolate is good too)

I like this explanation. It kinda captures why I’ve been happy working at Joost. Content’s the thing, and vast amounts of content simply won’t go online in a stable, referenceable, linkable, annotable, decoratable form unless the people who made it or own it are happy. Which, in the current climate (including background conditions like capitalism and a legal system) I think means DRM and closed source. I love Creative Commons, grassroots content, free, alternative and webcam-sourced content. But I also want the telly that I grew up watching to find it’s way into more public spaces. If the price of this happening now rather than in a decade’s time is DRM and closed source, I’m ok with that. Software is a means to an end, not an end in itself.

All that said, I’d also like a chocolate teapot, of course. Who wouldn’t?

ps. and yes, I did Google to make sure that “chocolate teapot” isn’t some terrifying sexual practice. It doesn’t appear to be, and I’m left wondering whether it’s Englishness or the Internet that has warped my brain to the extend that I’d even consider such an interpretation of this lovely phrase… I blame the “Carry On” films….

Shooting Nick

Just started watching this one on the Raindance TV Joost channel, but I don’t have time right now. In the absence of a bookmarking system I’ll clutter my blog with links. It’s good to have more watchable stuff on Joost than I’ve time to watch :)

See also http://www.cascadesky.com/projects_nick.html

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From Joost : Shooting Nick

Intending to shoot a documentary about American life, middle-aged loser Dan (director Daniel Yost) is instantly kidnapped by a manic couple (Robert Blanche & Sarah Rosenberg) who demand that he documents their trip to the beach on video.Joostâ„¢ the best of tv and the internet

EMR (Joost UK only)

OK, what happens if I put an URL in the Blog text: box?

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0398037/

And how can I tag this to be in my “conspiracy theory” category? http://danbri.org/words/category/world/conspiracy-theory

Do blog posting APIs support categories? I hope at least Atom’s does…

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From Joost : EMR

Stuck in a dead-end job and living alone with his cat, Londoner Adam Jones (Adam Leese) spends his free time obsessing over the latest conspiracy theories on the internet.Joostâ„¢ the best of tv and the internet

Zoolander test

OK, well this only works in France…

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From Joost : Zoolander

Le celebre mannequin Derek zoolander (Ben Stiller) a toutes les chances de recevoir pour la quatrieme fois consecutive le trophee “Top-Model de l’annee”. Mais rien ne se passe comme prevu et Zoolander, effondre, voit son prix lui echapper au profit d’un jeune “hippie”, Hansel (Ow…Joostâ„¢ the best of tv and the internet