Category Archives: Technology

Computers and other artifacts

Linked Literature, Linked TV – Everything Looks like a Graph

Ben Fry in ‘Visualizing Data‘: Graphs can be a powerful way to represent relationships between data, but they are also a very abstract concept, which means that they run the danger of meaning something only to the creator of the graph. Often, simply showing the structure of the data says very little about what it actually [...]

K-means test in Octave

Matlab comes with K-means clustering ‘out of the box’. The GNU Octave work-a-like system doesn’t, and there seem to be quite a few implementations floating around. I picked the first from Google, pretty carelessly, saving as myKmeans.m. These are notes from trying to reproduce this Matlab demo with Octave. Not rocket science but worth writing [...]

Querying Linked GeoData with R SPARQL client

Assuming you already have the R statistics toolkit installed, this should be easy. Install Willem van Hage‘s R SPARQL client. I followed the instructions and it worked, although I had to also install the XML library, which was compiled and installed when I typed install.packages(“XML“, repos = “http://www.omegahat.org/R“) ‘ within the R interpreter. Yesterday I set [...]

Video Linking: Archives and Encyclopedias

This is a quick visual teaser for some archive.org-related work I’m doing with NoTube colleagues, and a collaboration with Kingsley Idehen on navigating it. In NoTube we are trying to match people and TV content by using rich linked data representations of both. I love Archive.org and with their help have crawled an experimental subset [...]

A Penny for your thoughts: New Year wishes from mechanical turkers

I wanted to learn more about Amazon’s Mechanical Turk service (wikipedia), and perhaps also figure out how I feel about it. Named after a historical faked chess-playing machine, it uses the Web to allow people around the world to work on short low-pay ‘micro-tasks’. It’s a disturbing capitalist fantasy come true, echoing Frederick Taylor’s ‘Scientific [...]

How to tell you’re living in the future: bacterial computers, HTML and RDF

Clue no.1. Papers like “Solving a Hamiltonian Path Problem with a bacterial computer” barely raise an eyebrow. Clue no.2. Undergraduates did most of the work. And the clincher, … Clue no.3. The paper is shared nicely in the Web, using HTML, Creative Commons document license, and useful RDF can be found nearby. From those-crazy-eggheads dept, [...]