The Time of Day

(a clock showing no time)

From my Skype logs [2008-06-19 Dan Brickley: 18:24:23]

So I had a drunken dream about online microcurrencies last night. Also about cats and water-slides but that’s another story. Idea was of a karma donation system based on one-off assignments from person to person of specified chunks of their lifetime; ‘giving the time of day’. you’re allowed to give any time of day taken from those days you’ve been alive so far. they’re not directly redistributable, nor necessarily related to what happened during the specified time. there’s no central banker, beyond the notion of ‘the public record’. The system naturally favours the old/experienced, but if someone gets drunk and gives all their time/karma to a porn site, at least in the morning they’ll have another 24h ‘in the bank’. Or they could retract/deny the gift, although doing so a lot would also be visible in the public record and doing so excessively would make one look a bit sketchy, one’s time gifts seem less valuable etc. Anchoring to a real world ‘good’ (time) is supposed to provide some control against runaway inflation, as is non-redistributability, but also the time thing is nice for visualizations and explanation. I’m not really sure if it makes sense but thought i’d write it down before i forget the idea…

One idea would be for the time gifts to be redeemable, but that i think pushes the metaphor too far into being a real currency for a fictional world where hourly rates are flattened. Some Lets schemes probably work that way I guess…

So I’ve been meaning to write this up, but in the absense of having done so, here’s the idea as it first struck me. I had been thinking a bit about online reputation services, and the kinds of information they might aggregate. Garlik’s QDOS and FOAF experiments being a good example of this kind of evidence aggregation. As OpenID, FOAF, microformats etc. take hold, I really think we’ll see a massive parting of waves, red sea style, with the “public record” on one side, and “private stuff” on the other.

And in the public record, we’ll be attaching information about the things we make and do to well-known identifiers for people (and their semi-detached aliases). Various websites have rating and karma mechanisms, but it is far from clear how they’ll look when shared in the public Web. Nor whether something robust and not-too-gameable will come out of it. There are certainly various modelling idioms (eg. advogato do their internal calculations, and then put everyone in one of several broad-brush groups; here’s my advogato FOAF). See also my previous notes on representing expertise.

Now in some IRC channels, there are bots where you can dish out credit by typing things like:

edd++ # xtechy

…and have a bot add up the credits, as well as the comments. In small IRC communities these aren’t gamed except for fun. So I’ve been thinking: how can these kinds of habits ever work in the wider Web, where people are spread across Web sites (but nevetherless identifiable with OpenID and FOAF). How could it not turn hideous? What limited resource do we each have a supply of? No, not kidneys. And in a hungover stupor I came to think that “the time of day” could be such a resource. It’s really just a metaphor, and I’m not sure at all that the quantifiable nature is a benefit. But I also quite like that we each have a neverending supply of the stuff, and that even a fleeting moment can count.

Update: here’s a post from Simon Lucy which has a very similar direction (it was Simon I was drinking with the night before writing this). Excerpt:

And what do you do with your positive balance? Need you do anything? I imagine those that care will publish their balance or compare it with others in similar way to company cars or hi fi tvs. There will always be envy and jealousy.

But no one can steal your balance, misuse it.

So who wants to host the Ego Bank.

The main difference compared to my suggested scheme, is just the ‘the Web’ and the public record it carries, are the “ego bank”, creating a playground for aggregators of karma, credibility and reputation information. “The time of day” would just be one such category of information…

Profiling GML for RSS/Atom, RDF and Web developers

I spent some time yesterday talking with Ron Lake about GML, RDF, RSS and other acronyms. GML was originally an RDF application, and various RDFisms can still be seen in the design. I learned a fair bit about GML, and about its extensibility and profiling mechanisms.

We discussed some possibilities for sharing data between GML, RSS/Atom and RDF environments. In particular, two options: RDF inside GML; and RDFized GML.

The possibility of embedding islands of RDF inside GML (eg. the GML for a restaurant might use RDF for restaurant-review or menu markup) is interesting, as would allow GML documents to use any RDF vocabulary to describe the features on a map. Currently, such extension data typically requires the creation of a custom XML Schema. The other option, “RDFized GML”, is to explore the creation of an RDF vocabulary that allows some useful subset of GML data to be used in RDF. I’ll come back to this in a minute.

While GML comes from the world of professional GIS, its influence is being felt more widely: Google Earth (formerly Keyhole) uses something called KML, which bears a great many similarities with GML. Meanwhile in the RDF and RSS/Atom world, the very basic addition of “geo:lat” and “geo:long” tagging (sometimes using the W3C SemWeb IG WGS_84 namespace) has got a number of toolmakers interested. This year has seen the release of Yahoo! Maps, Google Maps, Google Earth and most recently Microsoft Virtual Earth. We’ve also seen the release of the excellent Mapping Hacks book, and increasing interest in this area from Web developers.

Although the experimental SWIG RDF vocabulary only deals with points described in WGS_84, there have been various discussions on possible extensions (eg. RDFGeom-2d from Chris Goad). These are intriguing, but we should be careful to avoid re-inventing wheels. Basically, I think we have all the ingredients for a hybrid approach: an RDFized GML subset designed for use by Web developers alongside RSS/Atom, FOAF and other public-facing XML formats. GML serves well as a data format in the GIS community, but some work is needed to find a subset that will find adoption in the wider Web.

The tiny W3C SWIG vocab, and related geo:lat/long tagging of “geo”-RSS feeds has shown that there is real interest in a lightweight XML-based mechanism for sharing map-related markup. GML shows us (via a 600 page specification, for GML 3.1) quite how rich and complex a problem space we’re facing, and KML demonstrates that a medium-sized “GML lite” subset can get traction with webmasters and developers, when backed by useful tools and services.

There are two pieces of work to do here (setting aside for now the topic of RDF islands within GML documents). Let’s first find a strawman profile of GML. From my limited knowledge and discussion with others, something “GML 2-ish” but profiled against GML 3.1, is the area to explore. Then we try getting those data structures into RDF, so it can mix freely with other information.

I understand from Ron Lake that profiling is something that is actively encouraged for GML, and there are even tools to support it that come with the spec: have a look at subsetutility.zip. These files (thanks Ron!) show a pretty easy path for experimentation with profiles. In addition to the schema subsetting utilities, the .zip also includes (just as an example to help me understand GML) an example application schema CommonObjects.xsd, showing how to define things like ‘Building’, ‘River’, and a sample instance .xml file that uses it.

To use the profiling tool, just put the unzipped files directly in the base/ directory of .xsd files that ships with GML 3.1, then run an XSLT processor to generate a GML subset.

xsltproc depends.xsl gml.xsd > _gml.dep

xsltproc GML3.1.1Subset.xsl _gml.dep > _gmlSubset.xsd

…and that’s your profile. The scripts take care of all the dependencies (ie. they’ll read the 29 XML Schemas, so you don’t have to :)

The bits of GML you want are specified as parameters in GML3.1.1Subset.xsl. The default in this .zip is: gml:Point, gml:LineString, gml:Polygon, gml:LinearRing, gml:Observation, gml:TimeInstant, gml:TimePeriod

I’m no GML expert, but if someone can help get some instance data matching such a profile, I’ll have a go at RDFizing it. Also, of course, it will be useful to debate how many facilities from full GML would find use in the Webmaster (RSS, KML etc) scene.

Disclaimer: for now this is purely an informal collaboration. If we make something interesting, it might be worth investigation of something more formal between W3C (home of RDF, and where I work) and OGC (home of GML). For now, let’s just try out some ideas…