OpenID, OAuth UI and tool links

A quick link roundup: From ‘Google OAuth & Federated Login Research‘: “The following provides some guidelines for the user interface define of becoming an OAuth service provider” Detailed notes on UI issues, with screenshots and links to related work (opensocial etc.). Myspace’s OAuth Testing tool: The MySpace OAuth tool creates examples to show external developers […]

Google Data APIs (and partial YouTube) supporting OAuth

Building on last month’s announcement of OAuth for the Google Contacts API, this from Wei on the oauth list: Just want to let you know that we officially support OAuth for all Google Data APIs. See blog post: You’ll now be able to use standard OAuth libraries to write code that authenticates users to any […]

Opening and closing like flowers (social platform roundupathon)

Closing some tabs… Stephen Fry writing on ‘social network’ sites back in January (also in the Guardian): …what an irony! For what is this much-trumpeted social networking but an escape back into that world of the closed online service of 15 or 20 years ago? Is it part of some deep human instinct that we […]

MusicBrainz SQL-to-RDF D2RQ mapping from Yves Raimond

More great music-related stuff from Yves Raimond. He’s just announced (on the Music ontology list) a D2RQ mapping of the MusicBrainz SQL into RDF and SPARQL. There’s a running instance of it on his site. The N3 mapping files are on the  motools sourceforge site. Yves writes… Added to the things that are available within […]

Google Social Graph API, privacy and the public record

I’m digesting some of the reactions to Google’s recently announced Social Graph API. ReadWriteWeb ask whether this is a creeping privacy violation, and danah boyd has a thoughtful post raising concerns about whether the privileged tech elite have any right to experiment in this way with the online lives of those who are lack status, […]

MySpace open data oopsie

Latest megasite privacy screwup, this time from MySpace who appear to have allowed users to consider photos “private” when associated with a private profile, while (as far as I can make out) have the URLs visible of guessable. Whoopsadaisy.  Predictably enough someone has crawled and shared many of the images. Wired reports that the site […]

Open social networks: bring back Iran

Three years ago, we lost Iran from Internet community. I simplify somewhat, but forgivably. Many Iranian ISPs cut off access to blogs and social networking sites, on government order. At the time, Iran was one of the most active nations on Orkut; and Orkut was the network of choice, faster than the then-fading Friendster, but […]

Begin again

facebook grabThere was an old man named Michael Finnegan
He went fishing with a pinnegan
Caught a fish and dropped it in again
Poor old Michael Finnegan
Begin again.

Let me clear something up. Danny mentions a discussion with Tim O’Reilly about SemWeb themes.

Much as I generally agree with Danny, I’m reaching for a ten-foot bargepole on this one point:

While Facebook may have achieved pretty major adoption for their approach, it’s only very marginally useful because of their overly simplistic treatment of relationships.

Facebook, despite the trivia, the endless wars between the ninja zombies and the pirate vampires; despite being centralised, despite [insert grumble] is massively useful. Proof of that pudding: it is massively used. “Marginal” doesn’t come into it. The real question is: what happens next?