NoTube scenario: Facebooks groups and TV recommendation

Short version: If the Web knows I like a TV show, why can’t my TV be more useful? So I have just joined a Facebook group, “Spaced Appreciation Society“: Basic Info Type: Common Interest – Pets & Animals Description: If you’ve ever watched (and therefore loved) the TV series Spaced, then come and pay homage […]

OpenID, OAuth UI and tool links

A quick link roundup: From ‘Google OAuth & Federated Login Research‘: “The following provides some guidelines for the user interface define of becoming an OAuth service provider” Detailed notes on UI issues, with screenshots and links to related work (opensocial etc.). Myspace’s OAuth Testing tool: The MySpace OAuth tool creates examples to show external developers […]

Foundation Nation: new orgs for Infocards, Symbian

Via the [IP] list, I read that the Information Card Foundation has launched. Information Cards are the new way to control your personal data and identity on the web. The Information Card Foundation is a group of thoughtful designers, architects, and companies who want to make the digital world easier for you by building better […]

Yahoo: RDF and the Monkey

From the Yahoo developer network blog, Besides the existing support for microformats, we have already shared our plans for supporting other standards for embedding metadata into HTML. Today we are announcing the availability of eRDF metadata for SearchMonkey applications, which will soon be followed by support for RDFa. SearchMonkey applications can make direct use of […]

Flickr (Yahoo) upcoming support for OpenID

According to Simon Willison, Flickr look set to support OpenID by allowing your photostream URL (eg. for me, http://www.flickr.com/photos/danbri/) to serve as an OpenID, ie. something you can type wherever you see “login using OpenID” and be bounced to Flickr/Yahoo to provide credentials instead of remembering yet another password. This is rather good news. For […]

Begin again

facebook grabThere was an old man named Michael Finnegan
He went fishing with a pinnegan
Caught a fish and dropped it in again
Poor old Michael Finnegan
Begin again.

Let me clear something up. Danny mentions a discussion with Tim O’Reilly about SemWeb themes.

Much as I generally agree with Danny, I’m reaching for a ten-foot bargepole on this one point:

While Facebook may have achieved pretty major adoption for their approach, it’s only very marginally useful because of their overly simplistic treatment of relationships.

Facebook, despite the trivia, the endless wars between the ninja zombies and the pirate vampires; despite being centralised, despite [insert grumble] is massively useful. Proof of that pudding: it is massively used. “Marginal” doesn’t come into it. The real question is: what happens next?

Who, what, where, when?

A “Who? what? where? when?” of the Semantic Web is taking shape nicely. Danny Ayers shows some work with FOAF and the hCard microformat, picking up a theme first explored by Dan Connolly back in 2000: inter-conversion between RDF and HTML person descriptions. Danny generates hCards from SPARQL queries of FOAF, an approach which would […]

SPARQL for vocabulary management: theory vs practice

I’ve lately been thinking about whether the named graph support in SPARQL can help us evolve vocabularies and associated code (eg. generators and translators) in parallel, so that we know when the RDF generators are emitting markup that uses properties which aren’t yet documented in the ontology; or when the ontology contains terms that aren’t […]

Google boost Jabber + VOIP, Skype releases IM toolkit, Jabber for P2P SPARQL?

Interesting times for the personal Semantic Web: “Any client that supports Jabber/XMPP can connect to the Google Talk service” Google Talk and Open Communications. It does voice calls too, using “a custom XMPP-based signaling protocol and peer-to-peer communication mechanism. We will fully document this protocol. In the near future, we plan to support SIP signaling.” […]

Profiling GML for RSS/Atom, RDF and Web developers

I spent some time yesterday talking with Ron Lake about GML, RDF, RSS and other acronyms. GML was originally an RDF application, and various RDFisms can still be seen in the design. I learned a fair bit about GML, and about its extensibility and profiling mechanisms. We discussed some possibilities for sharing data between GML, […]

Data syndication

There have been various developments in the last week, via Planet RDF, on the topic of data syndication using RSS/Atom. Edd Dumbill on iTunes RSS extensions; a handy review of the extensions they’ve added to support a “podcasting” directory. See also comments from Danny. Nearby in the Web, Yahoo! and friends are still busy with […]